“Car parts, sofas, refrigerators, televisions and animal carcasses,” all the things that flow in arroyos

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Over the past few weeks, we have seen piles of garbage floating around in the arroyos during thunderstorms. Once the rain has passed, empty bottles, plastic bags and styrofoam should be picked up. Executive Engineer Jerry Lovato at the Albuquerque Metropolitan Arroyo Flood Control Authority also known as AMAFCA said, “We used to pick things up by hand and then we started using mechanical methods for picking up trash. In order to prevent trash from ending up in the Rio Grande, AMAFCA picks up the equivalent of a four-story building in just one year. “We also buy car parts, sofas, refrigerators, televisions and animal carcasses, “Lovato said. For this reason, they have bypass channels that filter waste. Lovato said,” One of those cases where we install a Weir. The water collects, it goes through some of these underground pipes that reduce the flow. Then on the other side, it cleans the flow to the next facility. ”He says it’s an ongoing challenge. trying to keep the arroyos clean. He has a message for the g ens who throw garbage in the canals. “I would just say please use a dumpster, there are a lot of dumpsters in town. Please use a dumpster, ”Lovato said. In addition to segregating the waste, AMAFCA diverts water from existing drains, which helps prevent properties from flooding. This tactic also allows the use of storm water. “Stormwater drainage over the past 50 years has changed a lot. In the past, it was about collecting water as quickly as possible and getting it to Rio Grande as quickly as possible. Today it’s about slowing down the water because stormwater is a resource, ”said Lovato. According to AMAFCA, they have more than 70 flood control dams and ponds throughout Albuquerque.

Over the past few weeks, we have seen piles of garbage floating in the arroyos during the torrential rains.

Once the rain passes the empty bottles, the plastic bags and styrofoam should be picked up.

Executive Engineer Jerry Lovato of the Albuquerque Metropolitan Arroyo Flood Control Authority, also known as AMAFCA, said: “We used to pick things up by hand and then we started using mechanical methods to pick up trash.

To prevent waste from spilling into the Rio Grande, AMAFCA is recovering the equivalent of a four-story building in just one year.

“We also get car parts, sofas, refrigerators, televisions and animal carcasses,” Lovato said.

For this reason, they have bypass channels that filter the waste.

Lovato said, “One of those cases where we are installing a weir. Water accumulates, it goes through some of these underground conduits which reduce the flow. Then on the other side which cleans the flow to the next installation.

He says it’s an ongoing challenge to try to keep the arroyos clean. He has a message for the people who dump garbage in the canals.

“I would just say please use a dumpster, there are a lot of dumpsters in town. Please use a dumpster, ”Lovato said.

In addition to segregating the waste, AMAFCA diverts water from existing drains, which helps prevent properties from flooding. This tactic also allows the use of storm water.

“Stormwater drainage over the past 50 years has changed a lot. In the past, it was about collecting water as quickly as possible and getting it to Rio Grande as quickly as possible. Today it’s about slowing down the water because stormwater is a resource, ”said Lovato.

According to AMAFCA, they have more than 70 flood control dams and ponds throughout Albuquerque.


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