Car parking – PKW Zubehoer http://pkw-zubehoer.com/ Thu, 20 Oct 2022 07:00:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://pkw-zubehoer.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/09/icon-2-150x150.png Car parking – PKW Zubehoer http://pkw-zubehoer.com/ 32 32 Changes to car parking rates from October 31, 2022 https://pkw-zubehoer.com/changes-to-car-parking-rates-from-october-31-2022/ Thu, 20 Oct 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://pkw-zubehoer.com/changes-to-car-parking-rates-from-october-31-2022/ 10/20/2022 – Permalink Associated topics: Finance and budget / Roads, transport and environmental maintenance Slight increases to Shropshire Council car park and on-street parking rates come into effect on Monday 31 October 2022. As per plans – approved by Cabinet of Council in July 2022 following public consultation – the majority of charges in car […]]]>
10/20/2022 – Permalink Associated topics: Finance and budget / Roads, transport and environmental maintenance

Slight increases to Shropshire Council car park and on-street parking rates come into effect on Monday 31 October 2022.

As per plans – approved by Cabinet of Council in July 2022 following public consultation – the majority of charges in car parks run by Shropshire Council are set to increase by 10p to 20p per hour, with many car parks remaining free.

The planned fees were approved by Cabinet and the full Council in February 2022 as part of the proposed fees and charges to be applied by Shropshire Council in 2022/23. The required statutory consultation is now complete and eight objections have been received.

There are seven strips of car parks and on-street parking areas operated by Shropshire Council, with strips 1-6 currently chargeable and strip 7 free.

The new price tiers for each band are listed below.

Hourly rates per parking lane

Band 1 – £2.80
Band 2 – £2.00
Band 3 – £1.20
Band 4 – 80p
Band 5 – 60p
Band 6 – 40p

Richard Marshall, Cabinet Member of the Shropshire Council for Highways and Regulatory Services, said:

“Due to an increase in the rate of inflation and the cost of running and maintaining our car parks and on-street parking areas, there will be slight increases in some of our parking fees.

“We appreciate that people are facing financial pressures at the moment, and we have sought to reduce increases as much as possible. However, not increasing fees at all would mean having to cut other essential services the council provides.

“This will be the first increase in parking fees since the existing fees were introduced over three years ago, and mall other boards increased expenses annually over the same period.

The current charges were introduced between November 2018 and February 2019. During this time inflation has risen dramatically, as have running costs, but the council receives the same level of parking revenue – and can no longer continue to subsidize car maintenance and operation. parks from other budgets.

“However, even with these changes, many car parks will continue to be free, and many will only cost 40p an hour. And even with a small increase, our prices will continue to compare favorably to many other parts of the country. . »

By law, any excess money Shropshire Council receives from parking over and above the cost of providing and administering it must be used for the benefit of road users.

Any surplus generated by these proposals would be earmarked for car park improvements and any additional surplus would be used to fund public transport services, road improvement projects and environmental improvements.

Meanwhile. a proposal for a – separate – review of Shropshire Council’s parking strategy was discussed by advisers to the Premises Oversight Committee on 29 September 2022 and will now be considered by Cabinet.

More information

      • A complete list of parking lots and on-street zones in each band allocation is presented in Appendix 1 ofJuly Cabinet Reportand full details of the proposed increases for weekly tickets, subscriptions and concessions for each car park are set out in Appendix 2.
      • The proposed level of fees and charges to be applied by Shropshire Council in 2022/23 was approved by Cabinet on 16 February 2022 and subsequently by the full Council on 24 February 2022 and included increases to all parking fees for the on- and off-street parking across the county.
      • Any changes to parking rates must be defined in a traffic regulation order (TRO) before they can be implemented. Before making such an order, a statutory consultation should be undertaken and due consideration should be given to any objections received. The required statutory consultation was conducted between March 24 and May 20, 2022. A total of 18 comments were received during the consultation and included one comment in favor of the proposals and eight objections.
      • Falcon’s Court car park in Much Wenlock will be a Band 6 car park as it currently is, not a Band 5 car park. A variation order was announced during the public consultation.

    In addition to the linear hourly charges, the specified car parks also offer: –

    Discounted weekly tickets
    Subscriptions 3 months, 6 months and 12 months
    Resident parking permits
    HGV parking rates
    Free coach parking

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Marylebone’s ‘crash pad’, which is the size of two parking spaces, sells for £295,000 https://pkw-zubehoer.com/marylebones-crash-pad-which-is-the-size-of-two-parking-spaces-sells-for-295000/ Mon, 17 Oct 2022 11:15:13 +0000 https://pkw-zubehoer.com/marylebones-crash-pad-which-is-the-size-of-two-parking-spaces-sells-for-295000/ One of London’s smallest apartments sells for top dollar! Marylebone’s top-of-the-line ‘crash pad’, which is the size of two parking spaces, sells for £295,000 A 14 square meter flat on York Street in Marylebone has sold for £295,000 The property offers just enough space for a sofa bed, a kitchen and a bathroom York Estates […]]]>

One of London’s smallest apartments sells for top dollar! Marylebone’s top-of-the-line ‘crash pad’, which is the size of two parking spaces, sells for £295,000

  • A 14 square meter flat on York Street in Marylebone has sold for £295,000
  • The property offers just enough space for a sofa bed, a kitchen and a bathroom
  • York Estates marketed the house to commuters looking for a London ‘crash pad’

Advertising

A tiny ‘crash pad’ sold for £295,000 despite being one of the smallest apartments in London.

The Marylebone property is just 14 square meters and is the barley of two parking spaces.

The Georgian townhouse, located on York Street, offers just enough space for a sofa bed, a kitchen and a bathroom.

York Estates marketed the tiny house as a ‘crash pad’ for those traveling to the capital.

The estate agency says the cost of living crisis has fueled a “growing demand” for tiny homes.

A tiny ‘crash pad’ in Marylebone has sold for £295,000 despite being one of London’s smallest flats

The Georgian townhouse, located on York Street, offers just enough space for a sofa bed, a kitchen and a bathroom

The Georgian townhouse, located on York Street, offers just enough space for a sofa bed, a kitchen and a bathroom

The Marylebone property measures just 14 square meters and is barley the area of ​​two parking spaces

The Marylebone property measures just 14 square meters and is barley the area of ​​two parking spaces

York Estates has sold the flat, which includes an en-suite shower room and open-plan kitchen, to a buyer who plans to use it as a part-time base in London.

The new owner also plans to offer the property on AirBnb when not in use.

Julia Lilley, owner and founder of York Estates, says rising rents, mortgages and energy prices are pushing Britons to buy so-called tiny homes.

“After the pandemic, we are seeing an increasing number of clients looking for a small flat in London as a base to base themselves during the working week,” she told The Times.

Earlier this year a seven square meter flat in Clapton sold for £90,000 and won bids from ‘all over the world’.

York Estates has marketed the tiny house as a 'crash pad' for those traveling to the capital

York Estates has marketed the tiny house as a ‘crash pad’ for those traveling to the capital

The flat has been sold to a buyer who plans to use it as a part-time base in London

The flat has been sold to a buyer who plans to use it as a part-time base in London

The new owner also plans to offer the property on AirBnb when not in use.

The new owner also plans to offer the property on AirBnb when not in use.

It has an en-suite shower room and an open plan kitchen

It has an en-suite shower room and an open plan kitchen

The sale of the Marylebone property comes amid Britain’s housing crisis which has seen property prices soar.

Inquiries from potential new home buyers have fallen for a fifth consecutive month, the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) monthly survey has found.

However, UK house prices have risen at the slowest pace since the start of the pandemic, with expectations for the year ahead suggesting a slight decline in prices.

The RICS house price balance – measuring the difference between the percentage of surveyors reporting price rises and those seeing a fall – fell sharply to +32 in September from +51 in August, signaling a slowdown in price growth .

September’s reading was the weakest since July 2020, and a separate balance for sales volumes was the most negative since May 2020, the figures showed.

Experts pointed to rising interest rates and an uncertain financial situation as having weighed on the housing market, as well as the expected rise in mortgage rates over the next six months.

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The cost of parking, funerals and concerts will rise in Middlesbrough https://pkw-zubehoer.com/the-cost-of-parking-funerals-and-concerts-will-rise-in-middlesbrough/ Thu, 13 Oct 2022 05:00:00 +0000 https://pkw-zubehoer.com/the-cost-of-parking-funerals-and-concerts-will-rise-in-middlesbrough/ The cost of parking, funerals and concert tickets could be increased by 10% as a councilor warns of a £15million financial shortfall next year. Middlesbrough Council has published its financial recovery plan ahead of the local authority’s executive meeting next week after a £9million financial shortfall was forecast for the 2022/23 financial year. There could […]]]>

The cost of parking, funerals and concert tickets could be increased by 10% as a councilor warns of a £15million financial shortfall next year.

Middlesbrough Council has published its financial recovery plan ahead of the local authority’s executive meeting next week after a £9million financial shortfall was forecast for the 2022/23 financial year.

There could also be a freeze on non-essential recruitment with proposals to hire additional social workers suspended and a £150,000 service could be cut before it is even operational.

Politicians will have to vote to approve plans that will charge residents more for city services as the cost of living crisis continues. Overspending has been attributed to salary increases, inflation (which stands at 9.9%) and high demand for services for children.

Read more: Shocking report reveals scale of staffing shortages in social services

Cllr Stefan Walker, executive member of finance and governance, said he hoped the financial decisions the board is currently making will not be permanent, however, it will not be straightforward going forward.

He added: “What worries me is we have a £9m overrun and then we look forward to next year and see what the budget will be – we have a £15m gap. pounds that we’re going to have to bridge too.

In Middlesbrough the situation is exacerbated by low levels of council tax collection compared to other parts of the country and the majority of households being in the lower brackets – so even when tax is collected it is not as much as in other boroughs that have more expensive properties.

Across all departments of the council, savings of £6.9m were proposed, with all departments seeing underspend forecast for the 2022/23 financial year, except children’s services which remain more than £6m over budget. The final overrun is now expected to be £1.66million.

Cllr Walker, who is the deputy leader of the Middlesbrough Independent Group, said: ‘I predict that over the next two years you are going to have councils that will not be able to balance their budgets and will go bankrupt. Middlesbrough Council is not in that position yet, legally we have to provide certain services, but legally we have to have a balanced budget.

The council is unable to borrow for day-to-day expenditure as the government can, however, it still has a legal obligation to provide social services for adults and children.

This means he often has to make tough decisions to avoid overspending, especially when demand is high.

The city’s Department of Children’s Services, which was found to be insufficient after an inspection at the end of 2019, has offered savings of £811,000 – although it is unlikely to meet this target. The financial pressures on the service are partly due to increased demand, the cost of temporary social workers and the rising costs associated with outpatient residential placements for youth in the care of the authority.

The report warns that the freezing of non-essential vacancies will put additional pressure on current members of the squad and could impact performance. Cllr Walker, who represents Coulby Newham, said the children’s services funding model is outdated because the council does not receive funding per child, as schools do.

Therefore, even if there is a sudden increase in the number of children in care, the council does not receive additional money to safely house and monitor them. He added: “We can’t let a vulnerable child down, it’s not a choice we can make.”

He wants to ensure children’s services are sustainably funded as they are expected to be responsible for 45% of council spending next year which could impact the work of others departments because funding is tight.

The department will also try to cut spending on external residential placements, which is expected to be over budget by £4.9m, by a further £300,000 by the end of 2022/23. However, the report indicates that this will be a very difficult objective because all possible reductions have already been taken into account.

An improved youth services package, costing £150,000 and agreed in February this year, will not take off as the council decided to scrap it to save money. He was supposed to work with vulnerable children in Middlesbrough who are affected by high levels of anti-social behaviour.

The public will also face mounting costs as the council proposes to raise fees and charges, to earn an additional £463,000. These would usually be increased as part of the February budget report each year, but due to high inflation the increase was brought forward.

This includes a 10% increase in bereavement services with cremation fees rising from £820 to £902 and burial fees rising from £660 to £726. There will also be a 10% increase in the cost of tickets for events at council venues including Town Hall, Middlesbrough Theater and Newham Grange Leisure Farm.

A 10% increase will also be applied to housing estate rents, parking charges, Stainsby crèche fees and registration fees which cover marriages, births and deaths.

The Adult Public Health and Social Care Department has projected savings of £1.4million. The department was more than £1million over budget according to recent forecasts.

There are plans to increase NHS contributions where there are shared responsibilities and to end a small hospital discharge scheme which has been dormant for three years. The department will suspend plans to hire a number of additional interim/acting social workers and delay the hiring of two child care support workers.

Concerns have been raised about the impact of the hiring freeze on the department’s ability to improve service ahead of Care Quality Commission inspections due to begin nationwide in April 2023.

The Department of Regeneration and Culture plans to save £648,000 by ceasing all new activity in the town center which requires the council to inject cash. According to the plans, there will also be a reduction in activities to develop museums and attractions.

The Environment and Community Services team predicts £419,000 in savings. The rollout of the proposed subsidized pest control service and enhanced tree maintenance program – both included in last year’s budget – will be delayed. Funds distributed through the community environmental kitty will also be stopped. Security at libraries and hubs will also be halted and recruitment for five vacant street guard positions will be frozen.

Read more: North East councils refuse to team up and investigate mass shellfish deaths

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Pocket forests can be as small as a single parking spot – would there be one in your area? https://pkw-zubehoer.com/pocket-forests-can-be-as-small-as-a-single-parking-spot-would-there-be-one-in-your-area/ Tue, 11 Oct 2022 05:41:00 +0000 https://pkw-zubehoer.com/pocket-forests-can-be-as-small-as-a-single-parking-spot-would-there-be-one-in-your-area/ Pocket Forests is a social enterprise that helps communities grow small native forests in urban areas. Founded by Dublin-based Catherine Cleary and Ashe Conrad-Jones in 2020, to date Pocket Forests has planted 75 Pocket Forests, working with 40 different communities across the country. But one of the most inspiring aspects of their success is that […]]]>

Pocket Forests is a social enterprise that helps communities grow small native forests in urban areas. Founded by Dublin-based Catherine Cleary and Ashe Conrad-Jones in 2020, to date Pocket Forests has planted 75 Pocket Forests, working with 40 different communities across the country.

But one of the most inspiring aspects of their success is that none of these social entrepreneurs come from a horticultural/botanical background. Catherine Cleary, an award-winning writer, and Ashe Conrad-Jones, co-founder of an event company, Gorilla Design, decided to take on this brand new challenge to help people make positive change.

Pocket Forests: Dolphin Barn

Catherine thinks planting trees is something we can all do to help create ecosystems on our doorstep and bring beauty to our cities: “We came across a concept called Tiny Forests during lockdown, spring 2020, and we loved it. But we couldn’t find anyone to do it in Dublin.

Within our nature-private 2km radius in the city center, we saw potential pockets of urban native forests everywhere.

After extensive research, Catherine and Ashe developed their own planting method, inspired by the concept of “little forests”, developed by Japanese botanist Akira Miyawake. Their “pocket forests” recreate a miniature version of a natural forest, complete with its three layers: a canopy of tall trees, a layer of shrubs and a ground cover.

Catherine explains that the isolated trees, with bare ground underneath, that you see all the time in parks and gardens, are not in their natural state. Trees grow in communities of plants, collaborating with each other.

From left Ashe Conrad-Jones;  Denise Charlton, Chief Executive of the Community Foundation for Ireland with Catherine Cleary;  and Amy Van den Broek of Pocket Forests.  Photo: Naoise Culhane
From left Ashe Conrad-Jones; Denise Charlton, Chief Executive of the Community Foundation for Ireland with Catherine Cleary; and Amy Van den Broek of Pocket Forests. Photo: Naoise Culhane

“Trees need companionship. A lot of what we talk to kids about is community and that trees are not in competition with each other. They actually collaborate. It’s too hard to do this alone in a city, so they need each other as much as people.

What a beautiful metaphor for young people!

New forests

Pocket Forests is currently working with Change X on a project that will create forests in five schools in the Dublin area. They work with the children to prepare the ground by putting cardboard and woody material and mulching the ground before planting begins.

“We really try to mimic some of the conditions of a forest floor before the trees are planted. Ideally, what we’re trying to do is create an ecosystem. Obviously, this is a job that the natural world does far better than we do. But we know, from all the research, how to create beneficial conditions for trees.

So it’s woody material, it’s leaf mulch, it’s a lot of organic matter put on top of the soil rather than being dug into it.

Pocket Forests uses a permaculture approach to encourage microbes and earthworms to do the heavy lifting instead of humans with shovels. This means people of all abilities and ages can get involved.

The heart of a pocket forest is the involvement of the local community. Residents help with land preparation, planting and maintenance. For this reason, pocket forests maintain lasting ties with the people who helped plant them.

Pocket Forests: Mercy College phase 1 complete
Pocket Forests: Mercy College phase 1 complete

“Not everything needs to be clean and tidy, with grass clippings, and there are lots of places in urban areas that aren’t particularly useful to people.

“We don’t want to take up play spaces for the kids, but there are a lot of little areas that aren’t used for anything and yet someone mows them every week. So those are the perfect places to put pocket forests. , because you get so many birds, you get so many insects, even in the first growing season.

Thanks to the Ministry of Agriculture’s Woodlands Support Fund, this bare root season will also see 20 small forests planted in communities and schools across the country.

Some pocket forests are as small as a single parking spot, and I think that’s one of the keys to the success of this idea. Planting trees or groups of trees often seems to scare people away – either because they think they will be difficult to maintain/control, or they will create too much shade, or the roots will cause damage.

Pocket Forests: Amy VandenBroek, Catherine Cleary and Ashe Conrad-Jones pocketforests.ie
Pocket Forests: Amy VandenBroek, Catherine Cleary and Ashe Conrad-Jones pocketforests.ie

Catherine explains, “I think part of it is overcoming the fear of planting trees. Our trees can be pruned if you need to keep them small, or if you have the space they can grow to full size.

Working together to plant a pocket forest reconnects communities with nature, but perhaps more importantly, these inspiring women have shown us how we can all help change the world, even if it’s one pocket at a time.

Biodiversity refers to the variety of life on earth, their communities and the habitats in which they live.

It relates to the idea of ​​ecosystems – the interconnected web of natural processes and species.

Monoculture – where one crop or animal is grown over large areas – is a less stable system than one that includes more biodiversity.

Habitats with less biodiversity lead to species extinction.

  • Juanita Browne has written a number of wildlife books, including My First Irish Animal Book and The Big Book of Irish Wildlife.
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Parking – Frankston City Council https://pkw-zubehoer.com/parking-frankston-city-council/ Fri, 07 Oct 2022 03:25:06 +0000 https://pkw-zubehoer.com/parking-frankston-city-council/ Most street parking in Frankston City is free, except on the foreshore. When parking, please observe the time limits and conditions indicated on the posted signage. Off-street parking is provided by the Council and private operators including Bayside and Karingal Hub. Most off-street parking in the city center is paid parking. Free off-road parking spaces […]]]>


Most street parking in Frankston City is free, except on the foreshore. When parking, please observe the time limits and conditions indicated on the posted signage.

Off-street parking is provided by the Council and private operators including Bayside and Karingal Hub. Most off-street parking in the city center is paid parking.

Free off-road parking spaces are available next to the following stations:

  • Frankston
  • Kananook
  • Seaford.

For more information, please download the Frankston Town Center Parking Map(PDF, 120 KB).

Parking at the Frankston Arts Center

Visit the Frankston Arts Center website for more information on permanent and day parking options available.

Stay informed of upcoming works

Changes to Chisholm parking lot

Redevelopment work is underway at the Chisholm Institute on Fletcher Road. Every effort is made to ensure that there will be no loss of parking spaces during their construction works.


Parking changes

The following car parks have been restored to their original state after the work of the level crossing removal project:

  • Fletcher Road car park: 122 Young Street, Frankston
  • Playne Street car park: corner of Playne, Young and Davey streets
  • Mechanics Institute parking lot: corner of Bay Street and Plowman Place

Please follow the signs at these locations when parking.

Visit Victoria’s Big Build website for more information on the level crossing removal project.

Residential parking permit

You may be eligible for a residential parking permit if you live on a street where parking restrictions apply. Eligible residents are entitled to a maximum of:

  • 3 residential parking permits per household
  • 2 residential parking permits per unit.

Apply for or renew a residential parking permit

Parking on nature lanes

Under the Road Safety Act 1986 (Vic) it is illegal to park on a natural grassed or landscaped strip without specific exemption. Each Council is responsible for enforcing this law.

The state government introduced these rules to:

  • protect natural strips and infrastructure below
  • ensure the safety of pedestrians and vehicles, especially when exiting aisles.

If you believe there is a lack of access to on-street parking at your property, please call the Council’s infrastructure team on 1300 322 322 to discuss potential solutions.

For more information, please download the Road safety rules 2017(PDF, 7 MB).

Parking near the civic center

If you are visiting Council offices there is a selection of parking zones with varying durations. Please pay attention to signage before parking as penalties may apply.

Please note that the parking lot directly behind the Civic Center requires a parking permit. Download the Parking near Frankston City Council Civic Center(PDF, 3 MB) map for more information.

Report faulty ticket machines

Please call us on 1300 322 322 to let us know of ATMs in need of repair.

Please note that all parking time limits and rates are correct at the time of publication and subject to change without notice.

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Free parking in the city center extended until April 1, 2023 https://pkw-zubehoer.com/free-parking-in-the-city-center-extended-until-april-1-2023/ Thu, 06 Oct 2022 15:10:56 +0000 https://pkw-zubehoer.com/free-parking-in-the-city-center-extended-until-april-1-2023/ Bridgend County City Council has confirmed that free parking will remain available at two council-operated town center car parks. This continued support from the council aims to help local commerce and shoppers recover from the pandemic, as well as deal with the current cost of living crisis. Visitors can continue to park for free for […]]]>

Bridgend County City Council has confirmed that free parking will remain available at two council-operated town center car parks. This continued support from the council aims to help local commerce and shoppers recover from the pandemic, as well as deal with the current cost of living crisis.

Visitors can continue to park for free for the first three hours at the Rhiw multi-storey car park in Bridgend and between midday and 3pm at John Street in Porthcawl. This situation will be reviewed before the start of the summer period next year.

With free parking already available at Llynfi Road multi-storey car park in Maesteg and Penprysg Road car park in Pencoed, the free parking offer in Bridgend and Porthcawl was originally introduced at the start of the coronavirus pandemic as part of the scheme comprehensive council support for local businesses.


Bridgend County Council continues to support the local economy as much as possible during these difficult times.


We hope the extension of free parking to two of our towns will encourage footfall to boost local commerce, as well as help those visiting Porthcawl and Bridgend, particularly in the months leading up to and following the Christmas period.



Cabinet Member for Communities, Councilor John Spanswick

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Accessible Car Parking Info – From the Earth Comes Light https://pkw-zubehoer.com/accessible-car-parking-info-from-the-earth-comes-light/ Tue, 04 Oct 2022 13:56:38 +0000 https://pkw-zubehoer.com/accessible-car-parking-info-from-the-earth-comes-light/ There is a strictly limited number of accessible parking spaces available at the stadium site for the event, which will be made available on a strictly the principle of first come, first served using the process detailed below: Ticket holders for the event should call the Club box office at 01744 455052, telephone lines will […]]]>

There is a strictly limited number of accessible parking spaces available at the stadium site for the event, which will be made available on a strictly the principle of first come, first served using the process detailed below:

Ticket holders for the event should call the Club box office at 01744 455052, telephone lines will open at 9:00 a.m. Friday, October 7.

Accessible parking can ONLY be obtained by telephone, NOT in person and we CAN NOT ensure that all applicants can be allocated a place.

Parking is free and only one parking space can be reserved per person.

If successful, your accessible parking ticket will be mailed to you.

For all other St. Helens RFC ticket inquiries not related to the event, including the purchase or renewal of 2023 memberships, the ticket office will be fully operational from 10 a.m. on Friday, October 7.

PLEASE NOTE:

Anyone requesting an accessible parking space must present their blue badge and a valid event ticket to the parking attendant upon arrival. The name on the blue badge must match the name registered with us for the accessible parking space. If you do not present the two elements above, access to the car park will be revoked.

No other parking will be available at the stadium site itself, but additional parking in the city center will be available. More information on this and other key event information will be available shortly.

Thank you for your patience and cooperation.

Notes regarding accessible parking at Totally Wicked Stadium

Totally Wicked Stadium has a total of 202 parking spaces, 74 of which are accessible in the main parking lot.

The site comfortably exceeds DDA and UK standards which state that the site must have 5% of all parking spaces available for disabled people.

Often the demand for accessible parking far exceeds the supply, and unfortunately it is not mathematically possible to grant every supporter or participant their request for an accessible parking space, hence the implementation of the policy above for the 2022 season and for this event.

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The Council backtracks on the abolition of free parking https://pkw-zubehoer.com/the-council-backtracks-on-the-abolition-of-free-parking/ Thu, 29 Sep 2022 10:34:27 +0000 https://pkw-zubehoer.com/the-council-backtracks-on-the-abolition-of-free-parking/ Council’s ‘Borough Partnership’ has reversed a decision to scrap free parking in two towns in Tunbridge Wells after 80% of residents opposed the plans. The Lib Dem-led coalition cabinet, which also includes Labor and Alliance advisers, had planned to scrap the first hour of free parking in the Council-owned car park in Paddock Wood and […]]]>

Council’s ‘Borough Partnership’ has reversed a decision to scrap free parking in two towns in Tunbridge Wells after 80% of residents opposed the plans.

The Lib Dem-led coalition cabinet, which also includes Labor and Alliance advisers, had planned to scrap the first hour of free parking in the Council-owned car park in Paddock Wood and the first two hours of free parking on the Yew Tree parking lot. at Southborough in favor of a charge of 50 pence per hour.

But the move has sparked protests and petitions and even led Tunbridge Wells MP Greg Clark to call the plans “damaging” to local businesses in the towns.

The backlash over the proposals saw Lib Dem finance chief Cllr Andrew Hickey resign and leave the party to become an independent adviser earlier this year.

He has since been replaced by Broadwater Lib Dem councilor Christopher Hall.

Council launched a consultation on its proposal to scrap free parking last month, which aimed to address a growing shortfall in council finances which is expected to reach £3.4million a year by 2026.

As announced last week Time80% of residents who took part in the consultation said they were opposed to the plan to abolish free parking.

At a Cabinet meeting last Thursday (September 22), the Cabinet decided to scrap the plans.

While he has introduced a fee increase at other council-run car parks – which will see the first hour drop from around £1.50 an hour to £2 an hour and annual subscriptions increase from £50-80 a year – Cabinet voted against its own policy to abolish free parking in Paddock Wood and Southborough.

Instead, the Cabinet said it would seek ‘other funding options’ which council would ‘engage with Southborough Council and/or Paddock Wood Council to discuss’.

Defending the U-turn, new Chief Cabinet Officer Finance Adviser Chris Hall said: ‘Since my appointment as Cabinet Member for Finance in August, I have reviewed our budget plans during the year as well as our parking strategy.

“I would like to thank everyone who took part in the consultation on parking fees and who spoke on behalf of citizens at various public meetings. The consultation is an opportunity to hear the views of the public we serve and to take stock of the Board’s decisions.

‘As a new member of Cabinet I was able to review this and was delighted that we were able to reach agreement to change our original proposal, listening to businesses and residents about the impact on their areas’ , said Mr. Hall. added.

“While the main charges will need to be applied in full, to ensure that we deal with a very large budget deficit in the years to come, we will also be engaging with our colleagues in Paddock Wood and Southborough on how best to maintain the free parking their residents so clearly value.

“The Borough Partnership is committed to getting it right, and sometimes that means being prepared to change your mind.”

The decision was welcomed by activists and councilors in both cities.

Paddock Wood West independent adviser Matt Bailey told the Time“The residents and businesses of Paddock Wood were 100% against the new parking charges, including the end of the free parking period.

“So they’ll be relieved that this far-fetched idea has been dropped.”

The news comes after an earlier decision to start charging for parking at Dunorlan Park was also scrapped by the Borough Partnership, but the idea could resurface next year.

Council has asked its officers to conduct an “informal public consultation” to understand residents’ views on the “amenity value” of the park, including the introduction of parking fees, which could be implemented over the course of of the 2023/24 financial year.

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Parking issues at Letterkenny University Hospital to be looked into – Donegal Daily https://pkw-zubehoer.com/parking-issues-at-letterkenny-university-hospital-to-be-looked-into-donegal-daily/ Wed, 28 Sep 2022 06:30:42 +0000 https://pkw-zubehoer.com/parking-issues-at-letterkenny-university-hospital-to-be-looked-into-donegal-daily/ Plans are underway to look into parking issues at Letterkenny University Hospital. The Saolta group will study ways to free up space on campus and set up mechanisms to encourage staff to take alternative transport to get to the hospital. The LUH campus currently has 1,100 places. As of April 2022, there were nearly 2,000 […]]]>

Plans are underway to look into parking issues at Letterkenny University Hospital.

The Saolta group will study ways to free up space on campus and set up mechanisms to encourage staff to take alternative transport to get to the hospital.

The LUH campus currently has 1,100 places. As of April 2022, there were nearly 2,000 employees working in various positions at the hospital.

“There is an ongoing problem with the lack of parking spaces for patients, visitors and staff at Letterkenny University Hospital,” Ann Cosgrove, Saolta’s chief operating officer, acknowledged in a response to the Regional Forum on Tuesday. western health.

A review of existing parking arrangements will involve consultation with all LUH staff on reinstating short-term parking for patients and visitors only.

Another measure to consider is the abolition of registered parking spaces and the creation of a reserved car park dedicated to registered staff only.

The Saolta Group is also preparing to consult with staff to encourage and incentivize staff to use alternative modes of transport to get to work, namely carpooling, cycling to work, public transport, etc.

“A staff consultation period is currently underway and the outcome of this process will influence the reconfiguration,” Ms Cosgrove said.

The issue was raised by Donegal County Councilor Ciaran Brogan on Tuesday.

Parking issues at Letterkenny University Hospital will be reviewed was last modified: September 27, 2022 by Rachel McLaughlin

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Wokingham Council admits it won’t be popular, ‘but it’s the right thing to do’ – Wokingham.Today https://pkw-zubehoer.com/wokingham-council-admits-it-wont-be-popular-but-its-the-right-thing-to-do-wokingham-today/ Tue, 27 Sep 2022 08:24:26 +0000 https://pkw-zubehoer.com/wokingham-council-admits-it-wont-be-popular-but-its-the-right-thing-to-do-wokingham-today/ WOKINGHAM Borough Council has defended its plan to more than double parking charges and increase the charging period, saying it was the right thing to do and while it would not be popular, financial pressures that local authorities are currently facing mean that they have to make difficult choices. . At a meeting of the […]]]>

WOKINGHAM Borough Council has defended its plan to more than double parking charges and increase the charging period, saying it was the right thing to do and while it would not be popular, financial pressures that local authorities are currently facing mean that they have to make difficult choices. .

At a meeting of the ruling executive committee on Thursday, councilors will be asked to vote on proposals that would see fees for borough-run parking lots from 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. seven days a week. For now, parking is free on Sundays and after 6 p.m. the rest of the week.

Fees would rise, with an hour dropping from 80p to £1.30, while an annual subscription would drop from £900.68 a year to £2,026.

However, overnight passes for residents, which currently cost £292, would be free.

For vehicles in parking lots after 10 p.m., police have asked motorists to display a free sale ticket on their dashboard.

The council’s argument is that they have to make up for an £800,000 shortfall in parking revenue, caused in part by changing habits due to the covid-19 pandemic. Rampant inflation also has an impact on municipal budgets.

Last week, Cllr Clive Jones, Head of Council, said: ‘All of our departments are under pressure due to rising costs, which means that we have to look very carefully at everything we do to see if we can make any changes. savings and if we could increase more revenue.

“We need to do this to ensure we have enough to protect the most vulnerable in our community.”

READ MORE: Plans to more than double Wokingham parking fees revealed

The report to be considered at the meeting, which will be held in Shute End on Thursday September 29, adds that, even with the proposed increases, parking charges will remain “low” compared to other local authorities.

Officers believe the earliest implementation date would be January 2023.

Cllr Paul Fishwick, executive member for active travel, transport and highways, defended the plans.

“As a local authority, our number one priority is to protect the most vulnerable,” he told Wokingham.Today.

“To do this, in a time of immense financial pressures, we need to look at all of our expenses to make sure every penny is well spent, and then look to areas where we can generate revenue to make up for the shortfall caused by the galloping inflation and soaring energy costs.

“The cost of living crisis is affecting us all, and the council is not immune.”

He said that as part of this, the council had reviewed parking fees and they had not seen an increase in four years.

“They are some of the lowest in the area and region,” explained Cllr Fishwick.

“Raising them to bring them into line with our neighboring authorities is the right thing to do – to allow us to use the revenue generated from parking charges to use to maintain our motorway services.

“We know it’s not going to be popular – the increased charges never will be. But we are facing unprecedented financial pressures and have to make very difficult decisions. »

The new prices at a glance

Charges would increase as follows – up to one hour, from 80p to £1.30; up to two hours, £1.20-£2.50; up to four hours, £2 to £4.50; up to six hours, £3 to £6.50; more than six hours, from £4 to £9. Market traders would pay £6.50 for an extended day at the Cockpit Path car park instead of £4.

Subscriptions would be charged as follows: one month, £82.23 to £168.50; three months, from £240.35 to £506.50; six months, from £450.34 to £1,013; 12 months, from £900.68 to £2,026. A 12-month overnight subscription, previously £292, would be free.

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